How can it Help?

Every single school using the Looking for Learning Toolkit has said that it has helped them to focus more on learning.

Some schools have introduced the Looking for Learning Toolkit to raise standards and have been successful in achieving this. Others are finding that the Looking for Learning Toolkit is helping to provide a much more coherent school-wide approach to their existing focus on learning.

As a fully comprehensive guide to school improvement, the Looking for Learning Toolkit provides schools with significant Professional Development support.

In addition, the Looking for Learning Toolkit helps Headteachers to lead and manage a learning-focused school by giving them a framework and ‘how-to’ advice to make the focus on learning an ongoing, whole-school approach rather than something ad hoc. Many Headteachers working with the Looking for Learning Toolkit have said they have benefited from the management and leadership support that the Toolkit provides.

Every school uses the Looking for Learning Toolkit differently and gains in different ways but always it’s about improving learning. Here is what some schools are saying about the Looking for Learning Toolkit:

The Looking for Learning Toolkit is a huge success.

The Looking for Learning Toolkit is a huge success. It’s having a measurable impact. In the past, I was insecure because I knew there was great quality learning going on but I couldn’t prove it and I couldn’t identify it to then develop on it. Now, as a result of the Looking for Learning Toolkit, I can. What it’s done is given my team confidence of the learning that’s going on in the school. Nothing else has ever done that before. It’s the deepest thinking I’ve ever known. Now, with Looking for Learning, we are monitoring the learning that’s going on rather than the teaching and that makes so much sense.

When we started out with the Looking for Learning Toolkit we asked ourselves the first question: ‘what’s our definition of learning’ and we couldn’t define it! We just didn’t know what we were saying; we found it really hard to differentiate learning from teaching. I can tell you what teaching looks like but, at that point, I couldn’t tell you what learning looked like; nor could anyone else on the staff.

The Looking for Learning Toolkit is telling us everything we need to know about learning; how kids learn, what learning in action looks like, how to improve it. It’s all right there for us in the Toolkit. The thinking behind the Looking for Learning Toolkit is phenomenal and as we pick away at it we’re going deeper and deeper in understanding learning and how we can improve it.

Peter Pretlove, Headteacher

Bransgore Primary School, Christchurch, Dorset

As teachers it’s really good for us to take a step back and this is what the Looking for Learning Toolkit is helping us to do.

The great thing about the Looking for Learning Toolkit is that you can do it your own way. So, the big box arrived and the first question I asked myself was ‘how am I going to use the tools in here to benefit our school?’

As teachers it’s really good for us to take a step back and this is what the Looking for Learning Toolkit is helping us to do. We know a lot but we deliver lessons every day; day in, day out, which is why Looking for Learning is so important and why the observations and participating in them are so important, as they help to reignite us as teachers and remind us all what our real focus should be.

We’re a semi-rural primary with 225 children, a mature staff and dynamic TAs. I tried to sell this idea to my team: ‘we’re coming to this project from a position of strength so why do we need it?’ The answer was all about moving from a position of teaching to a position of learning.

One crucial message for some of my older teachers was that in the last 15 years, 85% of what we now know about the brain has been discovered which means that most of what we learnt in college has been superseded. The material on the (Looking for Learning Toolkit) videos is very powerful for getting the initial messages across to the whole staff - that this is all about the children. It’s about transforming the way we work. It made it very clear to us all that good, on-task, well-behaved children doesn’t mean a good learning lesson. We had to learn that now we’re facilitators, not teachers. There are a lot of strategies and techniques in the manuals to help identify and facilitate learning.

Owen Finnegan, Deputy Headteacher

St. Mary’s Catholic Primary, Studley