IPC Self-Review and Accreditation

The IPC Self-Review process can lead to Accreditation for the IPC

If you choose to implement the IPC you will also get the unique 2nd edition IPC Self-Review Process document which changes the IPC from being a tool box of great activities and resources to a curriculum which can really help transform your school into a school truly focused on improving learning.

To help schools achieve this the IPC has nine key principles, which are called the Bottom Line Nine. The BL9 are the nine non-negotiables of the IPC, that you need to get to grips with so that you can improve learning across your whole school with strands on how to implement the IPC for your learners, teachers, leaders and how to engage your community in their children’s learning. For example:

  • a shared vision about the kinds of children we are helping to develop
  • International mindedness
  • Assessment that improves learning

Schools use the IPC Self-Review Process in many ways: to base their SIP on, as a performance management tool to focus on what professional learning is needed, to really engage their parents and wider community and as a resource to check on how well the school is implementing the IPC. Schools can track their performance from beginning to developing to mastering in the Bottom Line Nine with the IPC Self-Review, supported by the 2nd edition IPC Self-Review Process document. There is also an option to develop the IPC Self-Review Process further and to work towards IPC Accreditation.

It is also possible to apply for a synchronized CIS IPC School Evaluation leading to Accreditation. This process uses the 8th Edition protocol to which has been added an extra Section H which covers the IPC criteria. NEASC, MSA and WASC are also able to participate in such synchronised processes with CIS and the IPC.

When you reflect on your own practice, share what you do and measure it against the IPC accreditation criteria, it provides a clear focus for moving forward and allows the staff to celebrate what they are doing and to ultimately provide a consistency across the school towards your focus on learning.

Yvette Jeffrey

Piasau School, Malaysia – an IPC Accredited school

Example Principle

A Clear Focus on Improving Learning

Group Beginning Developing Mastering
Early Years Learners In some classes children demonstrate what they have been learning about through play, exploration and engagement in motivating activities; they are helped to reflect and plan next steps in learning at developmentally appropriate levels. In most classes children demonstrate what they have been learning about through play, exploration and engagement in motivating activities; they are helped to reflect and plan next steps in learning at developmentally appropriate levels. In all classes children demonstrate what they have been learning about through play, exploration and engagement in motivating activities; they are helped to reflect and plan next steps in learning at developmentally appropriate levels.
Learners In some classes learners know and can articulate what they are learning, reflect on their learning and can use these reflections to improve their learning. In most classes learners know and can articulate what they are learning, reflect on their learning and can use these reflections to improve their learning. In all classes learners know and can articulate what they are learning, reflect on their learning and can use these reflections to improve their learning.
Teachers Some teachers make explicit the learningintentions and provide appropriate reviews with children to help them improve their learning. Most teachers make explicit the learning intentions and provide appropriate reviews with children to help them improve their learning. All teachers make explicit the learning intentions and provide appropriate reviews with children to help them improve their learning.
Leaders Some leaders develop the capacity with their teachers, learners and community, to ensure opportunities to improve learning takes place in all classes. Most leaders develop the capacity with their teachers, learners and community, to ensure opportunities to improve learning takes place in all classes. All leaders develop the capacity with their teachers, learners and community, to ensure opportunities to improve learning takes place in all classes.
Community A few members of the community know what their children are learning and support their children’s learning. Some members of the community know what their children are learning and support their children’s learning. Most members of the community know what their children are learning and support their children’s learning.

Examples of Evidence

A Learning policy which includes the school’s definition of learning; listening and talking to teachers, talking with children during lessons and also outside of lessons; discussions focused on learning rather than activity, displays, that reference new learning and gains in learning, planning, evidence of researching and recording learning, notes from parent teacher consultations, oral and written comments from teachers on children’s work, records of children’s learning such as IPC journals, staff meetings and staff meeting minutes, newsletters, discussions with/between teachers, leaders and with members of the community, information on the school website, and any information available to the community such as blogs and other types of social media, Early Years planning grids, Early Years Learning journeys, Early Years profiles, Early Years records of interests and developments, the classroom environment i.e. resources and areas conducive to open ended exploration, digital recordings, planned teacher observations, anecdotal records of spontaneous teacher observations.